Install this theme
yeatru:

awwww-cute:

A Seeing Eye Dog on his first day

he knows he’s gonna do such a good job

yeatru:

awwww-cute:

A Seeing Eye Dog on his first day

he knows he’s gonna do such a good job

alwaysstarwars:

This is my new favorite thing.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Colorful Clouds of Antares and Rho Ophiuci
Colorful clouds decorate this region of the sky surrounding the bright supergiant star Antares (left bottom) and triple star Rho Ophiuchi (top right). Probably this is the most colorful area visible from Earth.

The blue reflection nebula (IC4604) surrounding Rho Ophiuchus represents the visible counterpart of a much larger but invisible molecular cloud permeating the region and known as the Ophiuchus cloud. The area is highlighted by the bright star Antares as well, a red supergiant star, located at the bottom left of the image. The central core of this giant molecular cloud can be seen as a dense dark nebula, where no star visible on this picture. Although if we would imaged in infrared light, we could look into the dust seeing star formation directly, spotting many young stars there.  
This is one of the nearest and most studied regions of star formation in the local Milky Way at a distance of about 520 light years.

The following deepsky objects can be observed in this image: M4, NGC6144, vdB104, vdB107, IC4605, IC4603, IC4604, IC4605, and many more LBN and LDN bright and dark nebulae.

Credit: Ivan Eder

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Colorful Clouds of Antares and Rho Ophiuci
Colorful clouds decorate this region of the sky surrounding the bright supergiant star Antares (left bottom) and triple star Rho Ophiuchi (top right). Probably this is the most colorful area visible from Earth.

The blue reflection nebula (IC4604) surrounding Rho Ophiuchus represents the visible counterpart of a much larger but invisible molecular cloud permeating the region and known as the Ophiuchus cloud. The area is highlighted by the bright star Antares as well, a red supergiant star, located at the bottom left of the image. The central core of this giant molecular cloud can be seen as a dense dark nebula, where no star visible on this picture. Although if we would imaged in infrared light, we could look into the dust seeing star formation directly, spotting many young stars there.
This is one of the nearest and most studied regions of star formation in the local Milky Way at a distance of about 520 light years.

The following deepsky objects can be observed in this image: M4, NGC6144, vdB104, vdB107, IC4605, IC4603, IC4604, IC4605, and many more LBN and LDN bright and dark nebulae.

Credit: Ivan Eder

best-of-memes:

When I find the perfect rock on the ground to add to my rock collection

image

npr:

It’s October, which means it’s officially OK for Americans to go crazy about pumpkin and pumpkin-flavored stuff.
I’m fascinated by the pumpkin craze, so I searched our archives for related stories. I came across this neat 1996 All Things Considered interview about the origin of the pumpkin. The transcript is copied below. Photo: iStockphoto.
- Kate

DANIEL ZWERDLING, Host: And finally, to prepare you and your loved ones for Halloween, we have called Marjorie Cuyler [sp], author of The All Around Pumpkin Book, and we’ve asked her some of the pumpkin questions that undoubtedly you have been yearning to ask.QUESTIONER: What is the origin of the pumpkin?MARJORIE CUYLER, Author: The prevailing theory is that the first Indians who came to the Americas brought seeds with them from Asia.DANIEL ZWERDLING: How long ago?MARJORIE CUYLER: Thirteen thousand B.C.QUESTIONER: What is the oldest pumpkin ever found?MARJORIE CUYLER: The oldest evidence is actually in the mythology, in the Eastern part of the world. There’s a creation myth in eastern Indochina that the world was created from a pumpkin, and in Africa there’s some old, old stories about the pumpkin. There’s one about the devil dying and the pumpkin being born at that moment.QUESTIONER: Why do we carve pumpkins at Halloween?MARJORIE CUYLER: When the Europeans came to America, they brought certain customs with them. Certainly the ancient Celts had a tradition of carving turnips as part of the celebration of Samhain, S-A-M-H-A-I-N, which is a festival they held on October 31st to mark the end of the summer.DANIEL ZWERDLING: Turnips?MARJORIE CUYLER: And they would carve turnips because they felt that after 30- the 31st, winter would begin and spirits would walk the Earth during the darkness of winter. And if they could carry turnips with lights, candlelight inside of them, these lanterns would keep the evil spirits away from the people.DANIEL ZWERDLING: So how did carved turnips from the- from England get to be pumpkins carved in the United States?MARJORIE CUYLER: Well, when the Europeans came to America, the Indians were very helpful in teaching them how to grow pumpkins in mounds that were included among the corn crops. And as the settler- early American settlers began to grow pumpkins they realized that they could be used for the purpose of carrying lights inside. So they just felt that pumpkins were a more efficient vegetable than turnips or beets.QUESTIONER: What are some great moments in pumpkin history?MARJORIE CUYLER: On January 21st, 1950, a man named Alger Hiss was sentenced to five years in prison. Now back in the ’30s, in fact in 1938, he had been working for the State Department, and while he had that position he passed secret documents to the communists. Now the man who accused him in the ’50s, in 1950, was an ex-communist named Whittaker Chambers. And in court Mr. Chambers produced microfilm of the papers that he said Mr. Hiss had given to the Russians, and Mr. Chambers had kept the microfilm hidden in a pumpkin on his farm in Maryland. And that’s quite a famous story, and it certainly put pumpkins on the map.DANIEL ZWERDLING: Marjorie Cuyler is author of The All Around Pumpkin Book. And for this evening, that’s All Things Considered.

npr:

It’s October, which means it’s officially OK for Americans to go crazy about pumpkin and pumpkin-flavored stuff.

I’m fascinated by the pumpkin craze, so I searched our archives for related stories. I came across this neat 1996 All Things Considered interview about the origin of the pumpkin. The transcript is copied below. Photo: iStockphoto.

- Kate

DANIEL ZWERDLING, Host: And finally, to prepare you and your loved ones for Halloween, we have called Marjorie Cuyler [sp], author of The All Around Pumpkin Book, and we’ve asked her some of the pumpkin questions that undoubtedly you have been yearning to ask.

QUESTIONER: What is the origin of the pumpkin?

MARJORIE CUYLER, Author: The prevailing theory is that the first Indians who came to the Americas brought seeds with them from Asia.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: How long ago?

MARJORIE CUYLER: Thirteen thousand B.C.

QUESTIONER: What is the oldest pumpkin ever found?

MARJORIE CUYLER: The oldest evidence is actually in the mythology, in the Eastern part of the world. There’s a creation myth in eastern Indochina that the world was created from a pumpkin, and in Africa there’s some old, old stories about the pumpkin. There’s one about the devil dying and the pumpkin being born at that moment.

QUESTIONER: Why do we carve pumpkins at Halloween?

MARJORIE CUYLER: When the Europeans came to America, they brought certain customs with them. Certainly the ancient Celts had a tradition of carving turnips as part of the celebration of Samhain, S-A-M-H-A-I-N, which is a festival they held on October 31st to mark the end of the summer.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Turnips?

MARJORIE CUYLER: And they would carve turnips because they felt that after 30- the 31st, winter would begin and spirits would walk the Earth during the darkness of winter. And if they could carry turnips with lights, candlelight inside of them, these lanterns would keep the evil spirits away from the people.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: So how did carved turnips from the- from England get to be pumpkins carved in the United States?

MARJORIE CUYLER: Well, when the Europeans came to America, the Indians were very helpful in teaching them how to grow pumpkins in mounds that were included among the corn crops. And as the settler- early American settlers began to grow pumpkins they realized that they could be used for the purpose of carrying lights inside. So they just felt that pumpkins were a more efficient vegetable than turnips or beets.

QUESTIONER: What are some great moments in pumpkin history?

MARJORIE CUYLER: On January 21st, 1950, a man named Alger Hiss was sentenced to five years in prison. Now back in the ’30s, in fact in 1938, he had been working for the State Department, and while he had that position he passed secret documents to the communists. Now the man who accused him in the ’50s, in 1950, was an ex-communist named Whittaker Chambers. And in court Mr. Chambers produced microfilm of the papers that he said Mr. Hiss had given to the Russians, and Mr. Chambers had kept the microfilm hidden in a pumpkin on his farm in Maryland. And that’s quite a famous story, and it certainly put pumpkins on the map.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Marjorie Cuyler is author of The All Around Pumpkin Book. And for this evening, that’s All Things Considered.

When I started Stargate, I got the part, I was SO thrilled to have this INCREDIBLE character, to be playing someone in the military. I had SO much respect, to be playing someone who’s so smart and so liberated and… I thought “Yes!”

I had two weeks to move from Toronto to Vancouver. I flew out there, I had my first wardrobe fitting. And one of the things that was in… THE thing that was in the wardrobe room was a very low-cut tank top and a push-up bra…
And I turned to the costume designer - whom I’ve worked with since, who’s wonderful - and I said “What… What is this?”
And she said “Well.. they wanna see what you look like in it.”
And I said “…but this… NOBODY in the military, no captain in the US airforce would wear this… while her male counterparts are wearing crewneck t-shirts and… I c… I can’t do it!”
And she said “Well, they just wanna see what you look like and take a picture and…”
I was like “…”.
And I PANICKED because I thought, I had just been given this AMAZING opportunity - I didn’t know it would last 10 years but I knew it was gonna be a kick-ass show - and I was like… “I can’t do it…”

And I started to cry and I said “You have to go upstairs and tell them I’m not doing it. And if it means that they recast the part then recast the part but you’ve cast a smart woman and you’ve cast somebody who has NEVER tried to get a job based on her looks or her body, I’ve always played strong, smart women, I… I can’t do it. So if they wanna recast the part I totally get it but I’m not playing THAT version of this character.”

But I’m saying this while I’m blubbering because I’m suffering that I’ve just lost maybe the best job of my career…
And so she said “Okay” and I said “I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’ve NEVER been difficult, I don’t… but I CAN’T do that!”
So she went upstairs and she came back down and she said “Okay, no problem.”
And I said “Okay, so what’s my costume?”
And she said “Well…”
And I said “Just… What are the guys wearing?”
So she handed me a black T-Shirt and the BDUs, which is what my character would wear in the field with her male counterparts, and that’s where we went from there.

But that to me was the defining moment of…
And I STILL cry about it because I still remember that young woman on the verge of breaking into the… new something big, being petrified that she was gonna loose it, but… I knew that I couldn’t play the TNA version of Sam Carter.

Amanda Tapping

[x]

(via xgfan)

Every time I read this I’m so moved, because I just remember loving her character so much and being amazed by her, and how did this character come to be?  Well, the answer is a young, brave woman: Amanda Tapping.

(via esteefee)

boneycircus:

markruffalo:

aos-skimmons:

so I was thinking that mark ruffalo sounds a lot like mark buffalo, and then i decided that i obviously wasn’t going to be the only one who thought about this. so i typed ‘ruffalo the buffalo’ into google images and i found these…

image

image

image

i don’t know why but it made me happy 

I don’t know why but it makes me happy too.

…how are you real.

gwenjr:

I don’t know if this has been uploaded here yet but the guy who does those Punjabi remixes made a Sam Pepper parody video and it is just glorious

inspecterspacetime:

One of the biggest things that bothers me about Marvel has to do with X-23.

On the left is X-23 (Laura Kinney) as she originally appeared in the cartoon X-Men: Evolution. She was later brought into the comics and appears as she does on the right. Notice a difference? 

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

I never even noticed this!!

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

I never even noticed this!!